Ref to-- Transference, countertransf- therapist reactions

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Marina
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Ref to-- Transference, countertransf- therapist reactions

Postby Marina » Mon Jul 17, 2006 1:35 pm

Transference & countertransference

Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transference

Transference or righteous indignation?
Statement of Jody Wardell, Enon, Ohio

http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=m ... 1&.intl=us

HHS
http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=c ... 1&.intl=us

Countertransference

Countertransference has been identified and described in the writings on psychoanalytic and psychodynamic theory, but only recently has this internal reaction of therapists been specifically discussed in the child maltreatment literature.61 Countertransference is defined as the therapist's reactions (feelings, thoughts, statements and behavior) directed toward the client and brought about by the therapist's previous life experiences. A therapist's countertransference reactions may be generated by an aspect of the client's history, the client's presentation, or the interaction between the client and therapist. Examples of factors that may influence the therapist's reactions when working with abused and neglected children and their families include:

a previous history of child maltreatment;


early childhood relationships with parents and caretakers;


existing relationships with his/her own children;


interactions with the client–child, parent, or family; and,


previous clients with similar clinical or historical features.
Countertransference is significant in any therapeutic context because it can affect the quality and direction of the psychotherapy. Awareness of the issue is important in providing clinical services to abused and neglected children and families, especially if the therapist has a history of child maltreatment. Some mental health professionals suggest that therapists who have experienced child maltreatment may have inherent difficulties in managing their own reactions. Examples of their concern include biased interpretations of children's behavior, anger toward abusive parents, a perceived lack of participation or progress on the part of the abusive parent, limited or inappropriate interventions with abusive parents, and biased rather than objective recommendations for removal of children from their home or for family reunification.

Further examination of the manifestations of countertransference in psychotherapy with abused and neglected children and their families is needed. Friedrich suggests that therapists often have difficulty with countertransference when they become too rigid in their approach, have numerous unresolved victimization issues, and begin to define themselves as successful only through their therapy.62 The key to identifying and resolving countertransference issues is the therapist's ability to use the information he/she observes (i.e., think, feel, and/or see) about him/herself in the therapeutic relationship. For example, a therapist who feels deeply saddened as a result of interacting with a client and begins to divert his attention to his own feelings cannot adequately respond to his client. The alert therapist identifies and manages this internal response and converts it toward a sensitive intervention with the client.

Therapists must be alert to countertransference and its impact on their therapeutic interventions. It is helpful to discuss them with a clinical supervisor or colleague to develop objectivity. There is no indication that a therapist with a history of child maltreatment should not work with abused children and their families as long as potential countertransference reactions are identified and the issues are managed in a way that is beneficial to the client.

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HHS
http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=c ... 1&.intl=us

HHS
http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=t ... 1&.intl=us



Setting clear and ethical boundaries with clients
http://www.homestudycredit.com/courses/ ... ntsCB.html

transference and countertransference
http://www.homestudycredit.com/courses/ ... B13lo.html

SOCIAL WORK #211
1. Jim Martin
CLASS #11, November 21, 2000

http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=t ... 1&.intl=us

The Use of the Self in Psychotherapy:
A Comparative Study of Pastoral Counselors and Clinical Social Workers
1. Pamela Cooper-White, Ph.D.

http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=t ... 1&.intl=us

Articles Psychotherapy Concerns
Howard J. Shaffer, Ph.D.

http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=t ... 1&.intl=us

ASSESSMENT OF SAFETY, RISK,
1. AND PROTECTIVE CAPACITY
- TRAINER'S AND TRAINEE'S GUIDES -

http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=c ... 1&.intl=us

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Postby Frustrated » Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:31 pm

Now you mentioned that I think my OWN Counsellor from a different Agency disclosed personal information like these to CPS/CAS! Again, I never signed releases for him to disclose anything to my CW. But then again, they have to report any suspect of Abuse or Neglect or Both. :roll: What I don't understand that they would use your PAST Abuses against you.

Like...if you were abused as a Child, Counsellors have to "tell" CPS/CAS of that fact, because they "think" that you would be most likely to abuse your own Children?

eh? Just plain discriminatory if you may say so. What ABOUT CW? They were abused too, so they would be likely to abuse Children too! They would probably abuse our Children while in their custody.

Burn! :lol:
It is easy to steal from poor people. But don't do it. And don't take advantage of those poor people in court. The Lord is on their side. He supports them and he will take things away from any person that takes from them.~ Proverbs 22:22

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